Form I-9 Compliance May Not Apply to Everyone

Previously we discussed some of the changes recently implemented by the federal government in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, namely the revisions made to Form I-9 compliance. With these changes, Form I-9 can be approved remotely versus the typical in-person.

While the changes do allow remote inspection of necessary identification documents required of new hires, it’s worth noting that the relaxed compliance extends only to remotely operated employers and workplaces. If workers are physically present at a workplace, inspection in person always needs to take place within three business days of hiring. With that in mind, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (which oversees Form I-9 enforcement) will examine compliance attempts by employers operating physical locations on a case-by-case basis, taking into account whether quarantine or lockout procedures have impeded the ability of the employer to comply with the provision for an in-person inspection.

Employers who received a departmental Form I-9 inspection notice during March 2020 were given an automatic 60-day extension to become compliant. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security will decide whether further extension will be needed by the end of that time. Form I-9 enforcement laws and regulations and other immigration policies may continue to evolve rapidly in the next few weeks and months.

To read more, visit https://www.jdsupra.com/legalnews/alternative-form-i-9-compliance-65840/.

This update is by Jobs for More. We assist individuals in seeking employment within the government contractor company workforce by helping them find the perfect job market match. We believe in connecting businesses with the workers they need to achieve success. For more information about Jobs for More, jobs for veterans, or employer compliance, please contact us.

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Employer Compliance in the Age of COVID-19

The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) recently updated its guidance regarding employers’ compliance requirements regarding the Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) and the Rehabilitation Act and their relation to the COVID-19 pandemic.

The revised EEOC documents primarily adhere to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) guidelines. In a quickly emerging public health emergency, this CDC guidance may change. The EEOC guidelines are in response to the confirmation of the CDC and other public health agencies that the COVID-19 outbreak meets the requirement of the ADA for being a “direct threat”.

Employers may wish to consistently stay on top of updates to understand potential changes to their compliance obligations. As for the EEOC guidelines applying to employers covered under the ADA, these would include employers with a minimum of fifteen employees, including labor organizations, federal sector employees, and private employers, to name a few.

This update is by Jobs for More. We assist individuals in seeking employment within the government contractor company workforce by helping them find the perfect job market match. We believe in connecting businesses with the workers they need to achieve success. For more information about Jobs for More, jobs for veterans, or employer compliance, please contact us.

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DHS Is Allowing Flexibility Relating to I-9 Remote Employee Hiring

Last week, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) announced it would defer the requirements of physical preference linked to Employment Eligibility Verification (Form I-9) associated with hiring and re-verifying employees.

Prior to the announcement, DHS policy allowed employer representatives to perform the I-9 review process in person, reviewing the original documentation from an employee in their presence. However, with the COVID-19 pandemic, hundreds of thousands of US employees are now performing their job duties as remote employees. DHS will allow employers with workers taking physical proximity precautions to remotely inspect the Form I-9, Section 2 Identity and Job Eligibility Documents using methods like video connections, email, and fax, at least temporarily.

The temporary changes do come with a couple of caveats. For one, employers must use COVID-19 as the reason for the inspection delay and they are still required to inspect the Section 2 documents remote remotely no more than three business days following the hire. Furthermore, once regular operations start again, all workers who have completed the Form I-9 via remote verification are required to report to their employer for identification and job eligibility documents in person within three business days.

To read more, visit https://www.natlawreview.com/article/us-department-homeland-security-to-permit-flexibility-relating-to-i-9-compliance.

This update is by Jobs for More. We assist individuals in seeking employment within the government contractor company workforce by helping them find the perfect job market match. We believe in connecting businesses with the workers they need to achieve success. For more information about Jobs for More, jobs for veterans, or employer compliance, please contact us.

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Veteran Jobs Aren’t Necessarily the Ones They’re Trained For

Veterans, like other Americans, are benefiting from a booming economy and a competitive labor market. As a group, however, they are often frustrated by the challenge of translating skills gained during their service into private-sector jobs, few robust professional networks and a history of treating veterans as charity cases.

Underemployment is among the biggest problems faced by returning veterans— and by their partners, who often have to deal with several relocations. A recent study by LinkedIn found that veterans are over 35 percent likelier to be underemployed versus non-veterans.

As opposed to students graduates, many of whom select the major they decide to pursue, roles and focal points are delegated to a majority of those enrolled in the military. Many veterans are keen to shift gears upon leaving but lack consistent paths to do so.

Veterans, especially those with no college degrees, often need to choose jobs considered to be low skill, although their training and military culture could provide effective in other types of positions. There is, however, no clear pipeline to those jobs for veterans. Many jobs—particularly those in health care— necessitate licenses and skills training which veterans have obtained during their service. Even veterans who have gained profound knowledge and advanced emergency response strategies wouldn’t be able to access the lengthy credentialing process to gain employment as a physician assistant, for instance.

This update is by Jobs for More. We assist individuals in seeking employment within the government contractor company workforce by helping them find the perfect job market match. We believe in connecting businesses with the workers they need to achieve success. For more information about Jobs for More, jobs for veterans, or employer compliance, please contact us.

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The Clock Is Ticking on I-9 Form Adoption

Back in January, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) revealed its tweaked I-9 Form, which employers are required to use by the first of May. USCIS is urging employers to start using the form as soon as possible to onboard new hires as well as re-verification.

To confirm eligibility to work in the United States, U.S. employers must have each new employee fill out the I-9 Form when their employment begins. Employees must also submit paperwork to a representative of an approved employer as illustrated in the I-9 Form and its instructions. Employers are not allowed to require employees to provide certain documents such as a social security card to meet the I-9 requirement, but they do need to permit employees to apply any combination of documents that complies with the requirements of the form.

Changes to the new I-9 Form are minimal, though the most important may be the revision date showing October 21 of last year. Employers may wish to use this date to ensure that they are using the correct version of the form. Its instructions provide a better understanding of who is allowed to act as an authorized rep on the employer’s behalf.

This update is by Jobs for More. We assist individuals in seeking employment within the government contractor company workforce by helping them find the perfect job market match. We believe in connecting businesses with the workers they need to achieve success. For more information about Jobs for More, jobs for veterans, or employer compliance, please contact us.

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CARE Works with Veterans Dealing with PTSD

The process of transitioning to a civilian job can prove difficult for veterans, especially those that may be suffering from PTSD. According to a Veterans Affairs blog, more than half of these veterans dealing with the disorder are unemployed. This can have further ramifications such as affecting a veteran’s quality of life and their financial security.

Thanks to a program called Veterans Coordinated Approach to Recovery and Employment (CARE), veterans dealing with PTSD are receiving the help they need to secure a job in cities like Boston, New York, and more. It is a “pay for success” program aimed at providing placement and support services. After being accepted into CARE, veterans and service members will work directly with employment specialists to help them find employment based on their abilities, skills, and what they may prefer to do. This specialist will continue to provide their support to ensure the individual is able to maintain their employment.

Launched in 2018, CARE operates by investing private capital to grow evidence-based, funded job programs. The model allows federal, state, and local governments to collaborate with high-quality service providers by drawing on private investment to extend successful programs.

This update is by Jobs for More. We assist individuals in seeking employment within the government contractor company workforce by helping them find the perfect job market match. We believe in connecting businesses with the workers they need to achieve success. For more information about Jobs for More, jobs for veterans, or employer compliance, please contact us.

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The Importance of the Cover Letter

Many job seekers may be under the assumption that their applications are simply scanned automatically by a machine versus reviewed by a human being such as a hiring manager. However, according to a recent study, more than eighty percent of hiring managers believe cover letters hold great importance in determining whether a candidate is right for the job. While rejecting applicants that don’t include a cover letter may not be the best idea, it’s worth knowing what to look for when an applicant does include one.

Even with a provided cover letter, the applicant may not be the best fit for the company. Automated pre-screen surveys can help with cutting down applications by looking for specific items that automatically eliminate an applicant that may not have a required certification, for example.

When it does come time to read through cover letters, the motivation is crucial. A generic cover letter that doesn’t relate how the applicant’s experience is tied to the job may just be someone seeking a new job. Instead, consider concentrating on the letters that talk about how the applicant’s goals are similar to the company’s mission. This usually means the person has done their research and are genuinely excited about joining it.

This update is by Jobs for More. We assist individuals in seeking employment within the government contractor company workforce by helping them find the perfect job market match. We believe in connecting businesses with the workers they need to achieve success. For more information about Jobs for More, jobs for veterans, or employer compliance, please contact us.

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St Louis Implements “Ban the Box”

St. Louis is making the news after passing its new ordinance dubbed “Ban the Box”. With this new ordinance, employers will no longer be able to base their job hiring or their decision to give someone a promotion based on the individual’s criminal history. The ordinance is expected to go into effect at the beginning of next year and will apply to employers with a minimum of ten employees.

“Ban the box” states that candidates with a criminal history have fewer chances of being considered for a potential job when the information is mentioned on an initial job application and that disclosing a criminal history on an application also leads to exclusion from consideration. The new ordinance’s goal is to remove potential barriers to employment for people with a criminal history.

There are exceptions to the ordinance, however. For example, if the employer may show the decision is based on all available information, including consideration of the nature, timeliness, and seriousness of the criminal history, and the history is fairly relevant to or affects the position’s duties and responsibilities.

With the new law, employers will be forbidden from asking about the criminal history of a candidate until it has been determined that the applicant is otherwise qualified for the position.

This update is by Jobs for More. We assist individuals in seeking employment within the government contractor company workforce by helping them find the perfect job market match. We believe in connecting businesses with the workers they need to achieve success. For more information about Jobs for More, jobs for veterans, or employer compliance, please contact us.

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Federal Joint Employment Rule Provides Better Employer Guidance

The Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) was established more than seventy years ago and played a pivotal role in defining rules on minimum wage, overtime pay, and child labor. However, its rules don’t address the modern workforce where people may have temporary jobs or two different employers versus solely working forty hours for a single employer.

Starting next month on the 16th, the U.S. Department of Labor Final Rule will make a dramatic change to FLSA’s joint employer rule. The rule will have momentous implications for some employers and workers once it’s in effect.

Let’s use an example like a cleaner working under a company responsible for managing buildings while also working for a staffing agency. Which company has to ensure that the cleaner isn’t going over hours and is being paid minimum wage? In this situation, the cleaner/employee has one employer who signs them on to work but also another person or company — a possible joint employer — who gains a profit from the work at the same time. This serves as an example of scenarios addressed by the new FLSA rule changes, allowing joint employers to better figure out if they play or a direct or indirect tole in managing the employee and whether they are required to comply with the FLSA.

This update is by Jobs for More. We assist individuals in seeking employment within the government contractor company workforce by helping them find the perfect job market match. We believe in connecting businesses with the workers they need to achieve success. For more information about Jobs for More, jobs for veterans, or employer compliance, please contact us.

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New Bill Seeks to Boost STEM Jobs for Veterans

For veterans moving from the military into civilian careers, one of the trickier jobs to land are those in science, technology, engineering, and math, perhaps best known by the STEM acronym. Despite being qualified, prospective applicants may lack the training and transitioning skills requested by employers. A new bill may soon change all that.

Called the Supporting Veterans in STEM Careers Act (SB-153), the proposed bill would implement programs aimed at veterans through the National Science Foundation. The foundation would collaborate with other federal agencies to also increase similar programs. STEM education already exists in some schools and places around the country. Microsoft Software & Systems Academy at Randolph Air Force Base, for example, is run by and partially funded by the tech giant and provides training in cybersecurity and cloud technology. Other STEM-focused programs concentrate on all aspects of the job search and employment process, from writing an effective resume to the proper attire to wear to an interview and the terminology used on the job.

SB-153 has already cleared the necessary hurdles in the House and Senate and will now be evaluated by the President on its journey to becoming a bill. To read more, visithttps://www.ksat.com/news/local/2020/02/11/federal-bill-to-help-veterans-land-stem-jobs-in-civilian-sector/.

This update is by Jobs for More. We assist individuals in seeking employment within the government contractor company workforce by helping them find the perfect job market match. We believe in connecting businesses with the workers they need to achieve success. For more information about Jobs for More, jobs for veterans, or employer compliance, please contact us.

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